waiting for godot

Zoe and Charlie have a new little friend whom I am calling Godot. So far, I have not gotten a good picture of him. In contrast to the play, it’s Godot’s arrival that causes the waiting. He comes up on the deck, peers into the window and/or grabs some fallen seeds from the bird feeder, then dances up on the rail and away. Then the waiting commences.

By the large thud I just heard, I surmise that Godot has made an effort to get on the bird feeder and acquire his seeds first hand.

godota-little-tail

Squirrels and birds do not appear to like flour tortillas, in case you were wondering. I miss my raccoons and possums and skunks. What does one do with chicken bones in suburbia?

Today has been a gray day, feeling much colder than it really is. It has been one of those days that would be greatly improved by a fire, a good book and a nap. Instead, I made attempt #2 at peanut butter granola, listened to Stephen Frye talk about his life and edited a paper by a friend of mine to help with his French to English translation issues. The day is closing and I have no further observations for this week.

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10 thoughts on “waiting for godot”

    1. Oh, I’m just correcting the English for a native French speaker. He says his grammar sucks in French and he has no hope in English. Most of the interesting changes had to do with words that just don’t translate well. Like apparition may, strictly speaking, mean a non-paranormal manifestation; but an English speaker will read it as ghost.

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      1. Sounds interesting. So the “apparition” is not a ghost. So what is it? The promises of politicians are like apparitions, I suppose: they haunt us and then disappear. Some French expressions are weird like, “He has the heart of an artichoke.”

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        1. Hello and thank you for stopping by.

          In this case, he was talking about when a certain action first appeared in video games. The literal translation just didn’t work – which I think is mostly the fault of the English language. As I was editing, I was reminded of an article I read recently that discussed “rules” of English that we are never actually taught, we just know. How do you learn a language with rules that one is not taught but must still be followed to sound right?

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  1. Godot looks like trouble. 🙂 He’ll keep your cats exasperated, which for you will be entertainment. Your deck looks lovely, btw. Any plans for it once the weather gets warmer?

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    1. I’d like to get a table and a couple of chairs. And at least get one raised planter for herbs. We need to build a ramp – there are three levels to the deck and while I think I can manage the wide step down to the second level, I can’t do the stairs to the yard. But I think the ramp is more doable than I originally thought. It’s on the north side of the house so it will be shaded much of the day and there is a big mystery tree that I think will shade much of the north side of the house. Real gardening will have to wait but I need to maintain the rather nice landscaping that is there.

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      1. A three level deck! Now that’s something wonderful and treacherous all at once. I’d think that sitting out there would be lovely, and a ramp would certainly make it better. I’m intrigued by those raised planters for herbs, so I’ll be interested to learn how yours works out.

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        1. I’ll have to get a picture of it Ally. The other two levels are really just steps and landings. They make it difficult for me to get down to the yard but at least the main deck is level, more or less, with the house so it’s just a matter of getting over the threshold.

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  2. Oh, my. You really don’t want to lure anything to a big, multilevel deck with chicken bones. Skunks love to set up housekeeping under decks and porches. And they’ll return there year after year. Same with raccoons. Not sure where you live, but I live in Northeast Ohio, about three blocks from a river, and we have to do battle with skunks, raccoons, and even an occasional river rat family every year. Stick with squirrels. 😉

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    1. Hi and thank you for coming by. I used to live on the lake where it was truly wild. We had friendly raccoons, possums, skunks, foxes, etc., that never caused any problems and I was used to throwing out bones and other scraps for them. I think you’re right that I wouldn’t really want to attract wild critters (other than Godot and the birds) here in suburbia. I do miss watching the wildlife but there seems to be more chance of them causing problems up here.

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