not the kitty blog

share the chair

No, no… we are not going to turn into all kitties all the time. Really. It was just such a bad week that I didn’t get much of anything, including writing anything here, done. It was a week of very little sleep, at least at night. Someone told me to not worry about it, to sleep when I can. But really? I don’t get much done at night when I’m not sleeping and I sure don’t get much done during the day when I am sleeping. I should just readjust my chores and do them at night. Maybe the thought of vacuuming would put me to sleep.

Enough complaining.

The kitties made me laugh last night. Zoe has spent much of the week staking out Charlie’s chair. I guess he had enough and she wasn’t about to be pushed out – so they shared. It was cute. And sure, at 3 o’clock this morning they were fighting over a spot on the bed, but for a little while, they shared the chair.

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19 thoughts on “not the kitty blog”

  1. I’ve recommended this to you before (I MUST have), but I’m going to do it again. Get a book on tape or CD — nonfiction works best for me. Maybe something like The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Set up a CD or tape player next to your bed. When you can’s sleep, start listening. I defy you to stay awake for long. A droning electronic voice, especially one with a British accent, is better than any sleeping pill. And if you don’t fall asleep at least you’ll learn something.

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    1. Yes, and thank you. Sometimes that works. But pain trumps books on tape, movies, soothing music, podcasts, actual books and everything else I’ve tried. I hurt less during the day, I sleep better during the day. Doesn’t make sense but there it is.

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  2. Many people are on different work and sleep schedules, so whatever works best for you. But I’m sorry to hear about the pain! The kitties look very sleepy and content. I envy them!

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    1. I am trying to accept that I am just on a different sleep schedule. The biggest problem (other than when I don’t sleep at all) is trying to go do stuff during the day when my body just wants to be sleeping. I envy the kitties, too. They’ve amused me this past week after I wrote about their preferred sleeping spots and Zoe took over Charlie’s chair. Last night Charlie was sleeping on the back of the sofa in the living room. Don’t think I’ve ever seen him there. They can sleep anywhere.

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      1. Typepad has been experiencing denial of service attacks several times this past week. However, I did get duplicates of several comments,including yours. I wish everything would just WORK the way it’s supposed to, including sleep.

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  3. Yay! Seems like peace is finally breaking out between those two – after how long? As the owner of a British accent (English version, but hopefully not a droning one) I’m now wondering if an American accent would put me to sleep? I wonder if it’s because of the concentration needed to hear all the words spoken in an unfamiliar way which does it. Whatever works!

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    1. Heh! Perhaps you need to listen to a flat midwestern accent. Personally, the audio book option is hard for me. If it’s not interesting enough I won’t listen and part of the reason I listen is to distract my head. If it’s too interesting, I’ll stay awake to listen. As far as the kitties go, we’re peaceful sometimes. Then without warning, war breaks out.

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      1. Who speaks with a midwestern accent that I could find on Youtube? The only midwesterner I (think I) know is Gretchen Rubin, from Kansas City I think but now New York. Would you say she speaks with a midwestern accent?

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        1. That’s a good question. I grew up in Kansas City and I always thought we didn’t have an accent because everyone on TV (who was not playing an ethnic role or a role with a regional accent) sounded like me to my ears. When I moved to Wyoming, everyone said I had a southern accent and I could hear it when I would visit home, particularly southern Missouri where my parents retired. I haven’t heard Gretchen but Kansas City is a more metropolitan area and not what I was thinking of when I said a flat accent. Plus, she might have picked up New York which does have several accents of it’s own. I really can’t think of a good example right now. 🙂 Maybe TV people are still a good example because they try to get rid of accents, or at least they used to.

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        2. Oh, an midwest can be kind of hard to define – some consider it the whole middle of the country but you will find a pretty good variety of regional accents.

          Michael Symon is pretty close. He’s from Ohio. You don’t get the eastern accent or the accent you hear in Michigan. It’s not southern.

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  4. Oh Polly, I must apologize, but also defend my (unintentionally) rude comment by reporting that most Americans would love to have a British accent. Everyone British always sounds so elegant and well-educated. Speech seems to flow effortlessly with none of the “likes” and “ums” and “ya knows” that sprinkle American speech. I think the sound of a British voice is lulling to my ear, melodious and soothing. And THAT’S why it may help put me to sleep.

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    1. ah Pam, bless you! You weren’t rude and you didn’t offend at all! I find it really interesting how different our languages are, even though we supposedly speak the same one. Whereabouts do you live? I like American accents, particularly people like Bill Bryson and Northern Californian accents particularly. The southern accents are really musical, but I have to concentrate hard on those. I like the way we speak the same words but they sound so different. British accents vary so much. I like an educated English accent, but British also covers the Scots, the Northern Irish and the Welsh, all very different. A lot of British people drop their “t” and some London accents are hard even for me to understand! Have you ever seen the movie 84 Charing Cross Road? Reminds me of when Anne Bancroft (I think it was) said “Imagine a whole nation says rarsberry” (raspberry) and finds that highly amusing. Blogging’s wonderful for all the interesting things we can learn from one another, isn’t it? xx

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      1. Pam, I’ve just read this out to my husband and he told me when he lived in Alabama (near Mobile) for a while, he and a friend went into a pizza place but came out without pizza as neither side could make themselves understood!

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        1. Oh, that sounds like someone was pulling their legs! Though I can imagine your husband having trouble with a thick southern accent. I sometimes have trouble with a really thick southern accent – but worse, I’ll pick it up if I’m around it long.

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      2. I like most British accents – except what the movies do for Cockney. I have trouble understanding a heavy Scot or Irish accent, but they sound pretty. Not sure about Welsh.

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        1. I watched and listened to this video – he’s really interesting! I love his enthusiasm. I would be too into what he was saying to fall asleep. 🙂 Here is a Welsh accent for you. Start at 1:07. The driver is from the west country somewhere, the other guy is proper Welsh! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfwE7Gc6OT8

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        2. Okay…. that’s a pretty heavy accent. I think with most regional accents you just have to be around them enough to develop an ear for them. Sometimes I can’t understand my Australian friend – but that’s over the net with a not great mic.

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