mountains

Jill Kinmont Boothe died last month. The sequel to “The Other Side of the Mountain” came up in my Netflix queue and I ran a google search, wondering what she really looked liked. And there, tucked behind the google images, was the story of her death, February 9, 2012. She was 75.

I remember watching the movie when I was a young girl. I’ve watched it several times and just saw it again recently. Jill Kinmont was an inspiration to me growing up and still today, her story still makes me cry and awes me. I’m sitting here trying to come up with the right words and they all sound so corny. She did so much with her life. Despite her injuries? Because of her injuries? Because that’s just the kind of person she was?

When I was injured, friends told me that they couldn’t do what I was doing. Really? It wasn’t that dramatic! Anyway, I told them you do what you have to do. But there is more that I could do. I read the Reader’s Digest now and then. They always have a story of someone who has lost both legs and both arms and still goes and climbs a mountain. I wish I was more like Jill Kinmont. There’s still time. Maybe I will climb a mountain of my own one day. Maybe I’ll just be who I am and keep doing what I have to do from day to day.

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8 thoughts on “mountains”

  1. I remember that name-hard to believe she was that old. I thought she was MY AGE. I need to check out her story and see if I remember it correctly. People think I’m so brave too, but it’s a lot of acting and inner terror. 😦

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  2. Didn’t know about her local connection. I’m proud of my alma mater UW and the MISD for being progressive by not limiting her educational and job opportunities. It sounds like they were ahead of their time!

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    1. I think I read the book when I was younger but I don’t remember a lot of the details. And there is a gap in between the movies when she must’ve gone to Washington to get her teaching certificate and stuff. They were ahead of their time – it’s hard to imagine what it must have been like then.

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  3. I’ve never heard of this woman or the movie about her life. From the article she sounds like she had a very upbeat take on life. In a similar situation I don’t know that I would of been that cheerful about how things turned out.

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  4. She seemed to have a lot of tragedy in her early life but turned that around and made something positive. A very courageous woman. That must have taken a lot of energy. I’d never heard of her either, or the film of her life. Inspirational, thanks for sharing Zazzy.

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  5. I am old enough to recall when the first movie came out and I went to the theater to see it. I was a teen and cried and cried through it. I don’t recall the movie being panned as was mentioned in the article you linked. I watch it every time it shows up on one of the movie channels.

    RIP Jill.

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  6. It’s a movie well worth watching, in my opinion. Not perhaps the greatest movie ever made but one of the things I liked about it was that it wasn’t pollyanna sweet. They showed her struggles and the hard lessons it took to become the person she became.

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  7. Yup. You do it because you have to.
    I remember seeing the real Jill interviewed on Sixty Minutes, and then the movie. Her story was indeed a portrait of strength and perseverance.
    Recently in Mn we had two high school hockey players who were severely injured. Neither had regained function of legs or arms, but both are determined.
    If you haven’t seen it, I recommend the movie “Soul Surfer” – a true story about surfing champ Bethany Hamilton, who lost her arm to a shark attack in Hawaii.

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